Community Assets

Cavendish has a strong sense community, which has brought a host of tangible benefits to the village over the years. Running and maintaining them is only possible thanks to the many villagers who give of their time to make Cavendish an even better place.

The Duck or Grouse – The Green, Cavendish CO10 8BB


The Duck or Grouse occupies the ‘front room’ of a fourteenth century cottage. The front of the cottage was converted to a store in the same year that Henry V was given France as a wedding dowry (1420). The Duck or Grouse is thus a contender for the title of ‘Britain’s oldest shop’.

The village convenience store sells a wide range of groceries, including:
Daily newspapers, weekly/monthly magazines – delivered or collect in shop.
Alcohol a splendid selection of Wines, beers, spirits, mixers & soft drinks.
Fresh milk, bread, pasties, cold meats, bacon, sausages, eggs, butter, spreads, cheeses & frozen goods.
Larder essentials – tea, coffee, sugar, flour, condiments, jams, cereals, sauces, beans, tinned tomatoes.
Household staples – soap, bleach, kitchen roll, toilet rolls, washing powder, foil, greaseproof paper, washing up liquid, disinfectant.
Health & hygiene – paracetamol, cough & sore throat treatments, toothpaste & brushes, hand soaps.
Home & pet – coal, Logs, kindling, firelighters & matches, batteries, bird seed, dog & cat food.

Opening times are: 6am to 5pm (Monday to Saturday) and 6am to 2pm (Sunday)

The Cavendish Community Shop has some paid staff, but it is run mostly by volunteers – more are always needed to continue the project’s success. Details of the current rota are available in the shop, so if you can help, the times when help is required are there.

For any information about the shop or how to buy a share in the Association, please contact us by phone 01787 282371 or visit the shop.


Cavendish Magazine


Cavendish has it’s own Village Magazine, which is published monthly and contains information about all the activities and organisations that thrive in the village. In addition there are articles relating to anything of local and general area interest.

Cavendish School is well reported, with many articles and input by the children. We also report village news, and always welcome photos or articles about any subject, memories etc you would like to submit.

The Magazine only costs 50p per month, delivered to your door, or we can, at cost, post copies within the UK or overseas. If you would like more information, have any comments or suggestions, or would be interested in advertising, then contact us at info@cavendishmagazine.co.uk

To view a previous copy of the magazine, click here .


Memorial Hall & Jubilee Room – Melford Road, Cavendish CO10 8AD

The Memorial Hall

The Memorial Hall, Cavendish


The village hall was built in 1870 as a day and Sunday school. It was originally known as the Lecture Hall, but renamed the Memorial Hall in 1946 to remember those who died in two world wars. To the rear of the hall stands the Jubilee room, which was built in 1977 to celebrate the Queen’s silver jubilee.

The hall provides a venue for many different societies, youth groups, parties, et cetera.
The main hall is large enough for a range of uses from badminton to plant fair. It has a stage to accommodate a pantomime or a band. With separate bar and kitchen areas, the hall is also popular for social events and club dinners. The Jubilee Room is regularly used by the Playgroup but can also be hired for meetings.

The hall facilities continue to be developed by the Memorial Hall Management Committee. To support this work or for more information about their plans, please contact Don Parker on 01787 280549.

For bookings and availability, please contact Shirley Kemp on 01787 282319.


Information Centre – Phone Box, The Green, Cavendish CO10 8BB

Cavendish Information Centre

Cavendish Information Centre


In 1924 the Royal Fine Art Commission organised a competition to design a public telephone kiosk. This was won by the great architect Giles Gilbert Scott, who continued to refine his design based on the “moderne” aesthetics of the time. By 1935 kiosk number six (K6) had evolved and was rolled out across the country to become the British icon we know today.

Move forward to 1988, and the Cavendish box was removed from the site and replaced by BT’s more utilitarian style with an aluminium frame and three quarter length perspex sides. Fortunately the kiosk had previously been listed so, following swift action from the Parish Council chairman, a refurbished K6 was returned to the village.

The growth of mobile phones caused a marked decline in call box usage, and consequently BT began removing ‘redundant’ boxes. Fortunately, they offered many of their iconic kiosks for adoption by parish councils, etc, to be used for the benefit of the community.

Why not pop along and see how Cavendish are using theirs.